Types of Experiential Learning Opportunities at the University of Toronto

Experiential learning enriches your learning as a student. The experiential learning opportunities outlined on this page are designed to integrate your disciplinary outcomes with community engagement and competency development. This is where you get to put your education into action.

There are various ways to engage in experiential learning at the University of Toronto. Below you will find four general categories of experiential learning, each containing multiple possibilities for engagement. We hope that this overview will support you as you select your own experiential learning opportunities.

Selecting the Ideal Experiential Learning Opportunity for You

STUDENT DECISION TREE:

Use this tool to incorporate your personal goals and objectives as you consider which type of experiential learning is right for you.

What is it?

Curricular community-engaged learning provides opportunities for you to engage with community, nonprofit, or public organizations and reflect on the integration of course-based and community-based learning. You will learn under the guidance of a community partner, while ensuring the community is gaining value from your skill set and knowledge. These opportunities are typically supervised by a course instructor and are connected to a course or longer-term research project.

Why participate?

Curricular community-engaged learning offers you the chance to understand the issues raised in a course through the lens of a community partner. You will have the opportunity to learn new skills and encounter new perspectives while supporting community-identified priorities.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Curricular community-engaged learning takes place as part of a course. Eligibility requirements for these types of courses vary.

Duration: Curricular community-engaged learning opportunities may involve part-time or full-time hours with a community organization and can last from a few hours to a number of days or weeks over the course of an academic term. The timelines are variable and will be set within the course you are taking.

Recognition and / or compensation: You will receive course credit for participating in curricular community-engaged learning opportunities.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your academic program and your personal, academic, and professional goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or your registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: Community engaged learning courses are available through various academic programs at the University of Toronto. These opportunities can be embedded in a course, part of your degree requirements, or offered as an elective. Take some time to research the community-engaged learning courses offered through your academic unit. The Centre for Community Partnerships provides a list of many community-engaged learning courses.

Profiles:

Understanding the Role of Pharmacology & Toxicology in Society

Pharmacology and Toxicology in Society (PCL389) expands student knowledge regarding the science-behind and societal views of drugs with a focus on street and recreational drug use and substance abuse disorders. Classes focus on the science associated with drug use and class discussions integrate health/drug policy, socio-cultural and media views. Students spend 20 hours with a…

iPRAKTIKUM

iPRAKTIKUM is an experiential learning and internationalization initiative that helps students find impactful internships designed to promote global fluency and cultural competence and to deepen skills acquired in the classroom in work contexts. Placements are available at local schools and businesses in Toronto and Germany through futurGenerator, a program focused on sustainability and social innovation…

Health in Community

Health in Community is longitudinal curriculum for all medical students. Faculty members (physicians/allied health professionals) are paired with community agencies to deliver a challenging and immersive curriculum. Through in-class sessions, reflective assignments and community-based experiences, students participate, observe, contribute and explore advocacy as they investigate three key questions: what is community? Where is community? and…

What is it?

A field experience provides you with an intensive hands-on experience in a setting related to your field of study. Field experiences generally take place out of the classroom at a discipline- or profession-specific work site and is connected to a specific course. Your course instructor or a professional working on-site will supervise fieldwork.

Why participate?

Fieldwork can help to refine and develop the skills you are learning in your courses. Fieldwork offers an invaluable introductory opportunity for you to apply theoretical knowledge to real-world situations as well as potentially exposing you to a structured work environment.

Learn More:

Eligibility: Fieldwork experiences typically take place as part of a course. Eligibility requirements for these types of courses vary.

Duration: Fieldwork experiences can last from a few hours to many hours over the course of an academic term; timelines are set within your academic program.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your academic program and your personal and professional goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: Courses that incorporate fieldwork are available through various academic programs at the university. These opportunities may be embedded in a course, part of your degree requirements or, occasionally, offered as a co-curricular experience. Take some time to research fieldwork opportunities by connecting with your academic unit or your registrar’s office. Below are a few examples:

Profiles:

Bachelor of Kinesiology In-Field Learning

In the Bachelor of Kinesiology (BKin) program, professional placements, termed in-field learning, occur as a part of upper-year KPE academic courses. For these unpaid placements in the BKin program, students are matched with a qualified professional and observe and assist as appropriate in tasks with a kinesiology/physical education focus. Placements are offered in a variety…

Field Archaeology, NMC 261

Field Archaeology, NMC261 is a general practicum course for archaeological field methods with a focus on Near Eastern Archaeology. Partnered with Woodsworth College’s Summer Abroad Program, the course consists of a six-week archaeological field school which takes place in the Republic of Georgia. Students contribute to the active and ongoing research program of the Gadachrili…

What is it?

An organization-partnered project is an opportunity to support an external organization on a specific project. These opportunities are typically supervised by a course instructor and are connected to a course. You could support a creative performance, a design project, or act as a consultant to an organization facing a specific challenge.

Why participate?

Organization-partnered projects introduce you to the kind of work that is done in industry and community organizations, as well as the opportunities and issues organizations face when doing their work. They offer a chance to contribute to solving these challenges, while putting your education and skills to use.

Learn More:

Eligibility: Organization-partnered projects typically take place as part of a course. Eligibility requirements for these types of courses vary.

Duration: Projects of this nature are part-time and have a flexible duration; they can last from a few hours to many hours over the course of an academic term.

Recognition and / or compensation: You will typically receive course credit for participating in an organization-partnered project.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your academic program and your personal goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: Organization-partnered projects are available through various academic programs at the University of Toronto and these opportunities are generally embedded in a course. Check with your academic unit or registrar to discuss the best way to locate these opportunities.

Profiles:

Engineering Strategies and Practice, ESP

Engineering Strategies and Practice (ESP) is a foundational design course sequence that uses the engineering design process as a context for developing skills essential to the practice of engineering. Students work with clients facing problem in their workplace, community, or organizations. These are real world problems that students are tasked to solve through the utilization…

Understanding the Role of Pharmacology & Toxicology in Society

Pharmacology and Toxicology in Society (PCL389) expands student knowledge regarding the science-behind and societal views of drugs with a focus on street and recreational drug use and substance abuse disorders. Classes focus on the science associated with drug use and class discussions integrate health/drug policy, socio-cultural and media views. Students spend 20 hours with a…

Service Delivery Improvement (SDI) Project

Management at the University of Toronto Scarborough partnered with the Toronto East Quadrant Local Immigration Partnership (TEQLIP), a group that represents 40 newcomer settlement service providers in the Scarborough area. The agencies had difficulty tracking services due to a variety of data formats and were challenged in obtaining an overall sense of newcomer activity in…

What is it?

Co-curricular community-engaged learning provides opportunities for you to participate in projects with community, nonprofit, and public organizations. You will learn under the guidance of a community partner or a university instructor or staff member, while ensuring the community is gaining value from your skillset and knowledge.

Why participate?

Co-curricular community-engaged learning focuses on establishing a dialogue and relationship between the university and the community. This means that you get to take part in a civic and community-oriented educational experience while also becoming part of a larger community. You will have the opportunity to learn new skills and perspectives, often understanding issues facing specific communities in new ways, while also offering your own knowledge and expertise to support those communities.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Eligibility criteria will vary depending on the initiative in which you are interested in participating.

Duration: Co-curricular community-engaged learning opportunities may be one-time experiences or longer-term placements with a flexible duration.

Recognition and / or compensation: Most co-curricular community-engaged learning opportunities are unpaid and will offer recognition through the co-curricular record.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your academic program and your personal and professional goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit, your registrar’s office, or the Centre for Community Partnerships.

How to access / locate opportunities: Co-curricular community-engaged learning opportunities exist across the university. Some potential avenues to locate opportunities include:

Profiles:

iPRAKTIKUM

iPRAKTIKUM is an experiential learning and internationalization initiative that helps students find impactful internships designed to promote global fluency and cultural competence and to deepen skills acquired in the classroom in work contexts. Placements are available at local schools and businesses in Toronto and Germany through futurGenerator, a program focused on sustainability and social innovation…

Alternative Reading Week

Alternative Reading Week (ARW) is a three-day initiative during winter reading week, for students to volunteer in teams to support the needs of different organizations. By participating in ARW, students gain the opportunity to problem solve, work with peers from different disciplines and provide innovative solutions for community organizations’ identified challenges.

Community Youth Mentorship Initiatives, Indigenous Spirit Journey

Community Youth Mentorship Initiatives, engage students as volunteer mentors for youth on-campus and in the community through partnerships with local organizations and school boards. An example of a Youth Mentorship program is the Indigenous Spirit Journey. Over a 16- week program, student volunteers assist youth in experiential land-based activities aimed at: developing strong community leadership…

What is it?

An international experience allows you to turn the world into your classroom. The University of Toronto offers a diverse range of opportunities for you to go abroad. You may be interested in a course exchange, a research placement, an international co-op work term, or an international academic internship.

Why participate?

No matter where you go or for how long, learning abroad will shape you and how you see and relate to the world. You will experience different cultures, backgrounds, and forms of teaching. Learning abroad offers you academic, global, and professional advantages that will support you throughout your life.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Eligibility criteria will vary depending on the international experience you choose.

Duration: From a week-long program to opportunities that allow you to spend a full year abroad, there are various length and timing options available.

Recognition and / or compensation: Some international experiences are course-based and will therefore offer course- or program-credit. Co-curricular international opportunities may provide recognition through the Co-Curricular Record. If you are participating in a co-op opportunity abroad, you will be compensated by the placement organization.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on your academic, professional, and personal goals. Book an appointment with a Learning Abroad Advisor through the Learning Abroad’s contact form to find your best fit.

How to access / locate opportunities: The University of Toronto’s Learning Abroad website allows you to browse through a wide variety of international experiences.You can search by length of experience, country, area of study, language, and program type. The site also provides helpful tips and resources for planning your international experience, including information about potential funding opportunities.

Profiles:

Field Archaeology, NMC 261

Field Archaeology, NMC261 is a general practicum course for archaeological field methods with a focus on Near Eastern Archaeology. Partnered with Woodsworth College’s Summer Abroad Program, the course consists of a six-week archaeological field school which takes place in the Republic of Georgia. Students contribute to the active and ongoing research program of the Gadachrili…

What is it?

Land-based education explicitly links experiential learning with Indigenous cultures and ways of knowing and being. While Indigenous pedagogy precedes and exceeds “experiential learning,” land-based educational opportunities integrate some Indigenous connections and teachings explicitly into curricular or co-curricular experiences that might also be understood as experiential. Land-based education takes a variety of forms but always involves an environmental approach to the relationship between people and the land and a recognition of the deep connection between Indigenous peoples and the land.

Why participate?

Land-based education offers a way to both acknowledge the history of the land upon which the University of Toronto operates, while also incorporating an understanding of traditional Indigenous ways of knowing and being. Land-based education provides an opportunity to learn from and alongside Indigenous cultures and communities, and their relationship to the land, whether you are Indigenous or a settler.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Eligibility criteria will vary depending on the initiative or course in which you are interested in participating.

Duration: Land-based education opportunities may be one-time experiences or longer-term placements with a flexible duration.

Recognition and / or compensation: Some land-based experiences are course-based and will therefore offer course- or program-credit. Co-curricular opportunities may provide recognition through the Co-Curricular Record.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your academic program and your personal goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or your registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: There are various avenues to connect with land-based education opportunities at the University of Toronto.

Profiles:

The Anthropology and Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island (North America), ANT241

The Anthropology and Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island (North America), ANT241H is a community driven course by an Indigenous Action group (IAG) made up of members of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation (MCFN) with other Indigenous scholars, administrators and faculty. The overall goal of the course is to establish an Indigenous and settler…

Community Youth Mentorship Initiatives, Indigenous Spirit Journey

Community Youth Mentorship Initiatives, engage students as volunteer mentors for youth on-campus and in the community through partnerships with local organizations and school boards. An example of a Youth Mentorship program is the Indigenous Spirit Journey. Over a 16- week program, student volunteers assist youth in experiential land-based activities aimed at: developing strong community leadership…

What is it?

Academic internships are practical workplace-based experiences connected to a course or program of study, undertaken with the guidance of an experienced professional. An academic internship course includes both work experience and in-class academic components, the latter of which are intended to help contextualize and make connections between the work experience and discipline-based learning and theories.

Note: There are also internships that are not directly connected to a course or program of study. These typically fall outside the umbrella of experiential learning; you will need to be self-directed in locating these opportunities and making the most of your experience.

Why Participate?

Academic internships are a chance for you to gain professional experience under the guidance and support of an experienced professional, while integrating knowledge connected to your area of study. As academic internships are typically less structured than a co-op or co-op internship, you may have the ability to shape an experience that fits your needs, availability, and professional goals.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Academic internships have specific eligibility criteria that will differ depending on the course or program of study to which they are connected.

Duration: The duration for these opportunities vary. Academic internships will typically take place during an academic term of study with hours varying from part-time to full-time.

Recognition and / or compensation: An internship may be unpaid if it is for academic credit but must be paid if not.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on your academic, professional, and personal goals. Academic internships are generally completed in the latter portion of an academic program, as they support the exploration and application of discipline-based learnings acquired in earlier years. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: Courses and programs of study that incorporate academic internships exist across the university. Check with your academic unit or registrar to discuss the best way to locate these opportunities. Below are some examples of academic internships:

Profiles:

iPRAKTIKUM

iPRAKTIKUM is an experiential learning and internationalization initiative that helps students find impactful internships designed to promote global fluency and cultural competence and to deepen skills acquired in the classroom in work contexts. Placements are available at local schools and businesses in Toronto and Germany through futurGenerator, a program focused on sustainability and social innovation…

Internship in the Arts and Visual Studies: VST410H5

The Internship in the Arts and Visual Studies (VST410H5), offered by the Department of Visual Studies (DVS) at the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM), provides an excellent opportunity for students to gain practical work experience at an institution or business related to the arts and to visual studies. This course is especially tailored for mature…

Women and Gender Studies Practicum, WGS435

Experiential learning as feminist praxis has long been a fundamental part of Women and Gender Studies programs. Initiated in 2004, WGS435Y, the UTM Women and Gender Studies Practicum, is a year-long community engaged learning course that provides the opportunity for advanced WGS students to combine theory and practice through participating in a part-time unpaid placement…

What is it?

There are numerous opportunities to develop your job-ready skills through co-curricular experiences. These include taking a leadership role with a student club, working on the development and delivery of a student conference, participating in a job-shadowing program, or taking part in a hackathon.

Why participate?

Co-curricular simulated work experiences allow you to develop your skills, ability, and knowledge in areas that interest you and to contribute in various ways to the University community and society more broadly.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Eligibility criteria will vary depending on the initiative in which you are interested in participating.

Duration: Co-curricular workplace simulated experiences may be one-time experiences or longer-term roles with a flexible duration.

Recognition and / or compensation: Most co-curricular workplace simulated experiences are unpaid and many will offer recognition through the co-curricular record.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your personal and professional goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or your registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: The majority of these experiences are listed on the Co-Curricular Record (CCR). However, there may be additional opportunities that exist through your local division so take some time to reach out to your academic unit or registrar’s office to see what might be available and of interest to you.

Profiles:

Job Shadowing Program

The Job Shadowing Program expands students’ career thinking, supports their career exploration skills, and helps them consider what they could do with their degree. Both students and recent alumni (up to 2 years after graduation) are provided the opportunity to ‘shadow’ a professional for a minimum of a half-day, up to five days at the…

What is it?

There are two types of co-operative education programs.

Co-op involves alternating academic and paid work terms in opportunities related to your field of study. Co-op programs follow the academic calendar and allow you to explore various professional environments within a specific industry or field.

Co-op Internship involves a single work term where you work for an employer for 12 to 16 consecutive months after completing your second or third year.

Why participate?

The work experiences offered through each type of co-op program allow you to expand your knowledge, practise the latest theories and approaches in your particular discipline, develop employment skills, explore career options, and network with potential employers.

Learn more:

Eligibility: You need to be enrolled in a co-op program to participate in a cooperative education experience. Eligibility criteria differs for each program. Keep in mind that some co-op programs require admission directly from secondary school.

Duration: Work terms typically begin in January, May, or September and involve 4-, 8-, 12-, or 16-month terms of full-time work, although there can be some variation to these timelines.

Recognition and / or compensation: Co-op placements are paid by the placement organization.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on the co-op program in which you are enrolled.

How to access / locate opportunities: Check with the co-op office affiliated with your area of study. Below are a list of co-op offices at the University of Toronto:

Profiles:

Master of Science in Sustainability Management Program Co-op Program

The Master of Science in Sustainability Management (MScSM) Program is an interdisciplinary Program focusing on the intersection of science, business and community.Real-world learning and experiences are key components of our program design. Students complete a full 4-month co-op term in their chosen field of interest midway through their degrees, enabling them to put their coursework…

Professional Experience Year (PEY) Co-op

The PEY Co-op program is run out of the Engineering Career Centre (ECC) at the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering (FASE). In 2019 the Faculty celebrated 40 years of PEY Co-op. Currently, third-year undergraduate students register to participate in a recruitment cycle to compete for 12 – 16 months co-op work terms. The largest…

Arts & Science Co-op

Currently representing 35 academic programs at UTSC, the Arts & Science Co-op program houses over 40 years of expertise in co-operative education. We facilitate academically aligned paid co-op work terms and empower our students through extensive preparation: each Arts & Science Co-op student receives 55+ hours of job search training through co-op preparation courses prior…

What is it?

There are multiple ways to use your skills and knowledge to benefit society through entrepreneurship and innovation at the University of Toronto. There are courses, entrepreneurship programs (accelerators/incubators), and internships that introduce you to working in social enterprises or tech startups, provide opportunities to develop and launch your own business with support from experienced professionals, and help to develop an entrepreneurial mindset.

Why participate?

Exploring entrepreneurship and innovation while studying at the University of Toronto will give you the skills and resources you need to start, build, and scale your business ideas and/or an understanding of working in a social enterprise or tech startup space. Innovation skills are valuable in any career.

Learn more:

Eligibility: There are entrepreneurial opportunities available for students across the University of Toronto. Academic programs and courses that incorporate entrepreneurship will have specific eligibility criteria, as will programs offered by the various entrepreneurship programs (accelerators/incubators) that exist at the University of Toronto.

Duration: The duration will vary depending on how you choose to become involved.

Recognition and / or compensation: Some entrepreneurial offerings are course based and will therefore offer course or program credit. Some co-curricular opportunities will provide recognition through the Co-Curricular Record. Still others offer support and mentorship for your business idea in lieu of official recognition or compensation.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on your academic, professional, and personal goals. You may wish to speak with your academic unit or registrar about this.

How to access / locate opportunities: The University of Toronto Entrepreneurship page houses information about the majority of entrepreneurship and innovation opportunities at the University, including a list of courses and programs and links out to the various entrepreneurship programs (accelerators/incubators). You can also sign up for the Entrepreneurship e-newsletter for regular updates. Keep in mind that not all of these opportunities are experiential in nature.

Profiles:

Start-up Experience Program

The Start-up Experience Program matches a diverse range of undergraduate students to work with seed and early stage start-up companies supported by ICUBE UTM. ICUBE UTM mentors and supports students throughout a 5- to 10-week term, helping them develop transferable employment skills through a series of workshops, seminars, and micro work-term placements. The program consists…

New Venture Program

The New Venture Program blends academics with mentorship and relevant experience. It is a rigorous co-curricular program that involves the completion of several modules, culminating in a series of ‘defenses’ of a student venture’s business plan. Students will develop a strong background in business planning and management so that they can create sophisticated conceptual analyses…

What is it?

A professional practicum, also called a clinical placement, provides you with industry-specific skills cultivated in a professional environment under the supervision of a registered or licensed professional. This type of experience is primarily intended to support professional and discipline-based competency development. You do not have an independent workload while on a practicum but instead work alongside a professional.

Why participate?

For subject areas that require a professional practicum, many of the skills you learn in the classroom need to be supplemented with concrete experience. An integral aspect of a professional practicum is that you are given space to reflect on your experience, often receiving credit for written or oral reflections on what you have learned.

Learn More:

Eligibility: You need to be enrolled in an academic program that offers professional practicums. Eligibility criteria differs for each program. Keep in mind that some of these academic programs require admission directly from secondary school or from an undergraduate degree.

Duration: The duration of a professional placement varies and will be determined by your academic program.

Recognition and / or compensation:  These opportunities are generally unpaid since the work is done in a supervised setting and you will not typically have your own workload or caseload. You will receive course or program credit.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on the academic program in which you are enrolled.

How to access / locate opportunities: A number of professional post-secondary degrees require a professional practicum. You can learn more about some of these degrees below. If you don’t see your area of study represented, you may wish to connect with your registrar or academic unit to further investigate.

Profiles:

What is it?

The Work Study program is an opportunity for current undergraduate and graduate students to work on campus with faculty members and staff to enhance your disciplinary and professional learning. There are over 3,500 positions available each year across both the Fall/Winter term (September to February) and the Spring/Summer term (May to August). There are various resources and supports available to help make the most of your Work Study experience.

Why participate?

The Work Study program provides an opportunity to strengthen your skills, gain work experience, and explore how your academic studies translate into career possibilities. Since you are working on campus, you are generally able to negotiate your work hours to accommodate your course schedule and co-curricular activities with your employer. Your Work Study experience will also be recognized on the Co-Curricular Record (CCR).

Learn more:

Eligibility: The Work Study program is open to undergraduate and graduate degree students. Check the Career & Co-Curricular Learning Network’s Work Study page for full eligibility criteria for the current or upcoming Work Study term.

Duration: Work Study jobs typically require up to 15 hours of work per week to a maximum of 200 hours for the Fall/Winter term (September to February) and 100 hours for the Spring/Summer term (May to August).

Recognition and / or compensation: Work Study positions are paid, the Work Study Program minimum hourly rate is $15. Departments have discretion to pay a higher hourly rate.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on your academic, professional, and personal goals but you can participate multiple times throughout your time studying at the University of Toronto. Work Study is an excellent first work-integrated learning experience which can act as a launching point for future opportunities.

How to access / locate opportunities: Take some time to review important information about the Work Study program, including current eligibility criteria and timelines for the current program. During the hiring periods for the Work Study program, you can search available opportunities on the Career & Co-curricular Learning Network (CLNx).

Profiles:

Work Study Program, Heritage Language Variation & Change in Toronto Project

Understanding patterns of linguistic variation in multicultural and multilingual communities is the driving force of the Heritage Language Variation and Change in Toronto (HLVC) Project. Work study students design and conduct research projects that aid in developing and testing principles regarding which aspects of heritage languages (mother tongues that do not have official language status)…

What is it?

Faculty-led research can take many forms, including doing archival research for a faculty member, or taking part in a hands-on research opportunity in the field.

Why participate?

Participating in a faculty-led research opportunity allows you to work one-on-one with faculty members, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows. You will contribute to the creation of knowledge while enhancing your critical and analytical skills and deepening your understanding of a subject area.

Learn More:

Eligibility: Eligibility for faculty-led research that takes place outside a course will vary depending on the requirements outlined by the lead researcher.

Duration: Faculty-led research opportunities vary in duration but would typically be part-time and would last anywhere from a few months to a number of years, depending on the needs of the research project.

Recognition and / or compensation: Faculty-led research opportunities will typically be paid opportunities.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on your academic, professional, and personal goals. You may wish to consult with your academic unit or registrar to determine how best to incorporate a faculty-led research opportunity into your university experience.

How to access / locate opportunities: Faculty-led research-based experiential learning opportunities exist across the university and in almost every faculty.

Below are some sites that can provide a starting point when considering research-based opportunities at the University of Toronto:

Profiles:

Work Study Program, Heritage Language Variation & Change in Toronto Project

Understanding patterns of linguistic variation in multicultural and multilingual communities is the driving force of the Heritage Language Variation and Change in Toronto (HLVC) Project. Work study students design and conduct research projects that aid in developing and testing principles regarding which aspects of heritage languages (mother tongues that do not have official language status)…

Jackman Scholars-in-Residence

Jackman Scholars-in-Residence (SiR) is an annual 4-week undergraduate residency in humanities and social science research. SiR seeks to foster students’ research abilities, create a multidisciplinary community of students and faculty, and pioneer a collaborative, team-based model of experiential learning in the humanities and interpretive social sciences. Students live in St. George College residences, or at…

What is it?

Organization-partnered research opportunities allow you to work on a research project in collaboration with an organization typically outside of the university. These experiential learning opportunities are supervised by a course instructor and typically connected to a course, though opportunities can be found for more long-term partnerships or projects.

Why participate?

Organization-partnered research will connect you with industry partners and provide you with insights into how research is conducted outside academia. You will contribute to the creation of knowledge while enhancing your critical and analytical skills and deepening your understanding of a subject area.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Organization-partnered research that is directly connected to a course or program of study will have specific eligibility criteria that will differ depending on the course or program of study. Eligibility for organization-partnered research opportunities that are self-directed and take place outside a course will vary depending on the requirements outlined by the lead researcher or the initiative to which you are applying.

Duration: Projects of this nature tend to be part-time and have a flexible duration, they can last from a few hours to a more substantial time commitment over the course of an academic term or longer.

Recognition and / or compensation: Organization-partnered research opportunities that are course-based will offer course credit, those that are self-directed will typically be paid opportunities.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your academic, professional and personal goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: Organization-partnered research opportunities are available through various avenues at the University of Toronto. These opportunities can be either curricular or co-curricular. You may wish to check with your academic unit or registrar to discuss the best way to locate course- or program-based opportunities.

Profiles:

Urban Communities and Neighbourhoods Case Study: East Scarborough, CITC01

The course is designed as an introduction to the theory and practice of participatory action research with an emphasis on youth participation and questions of neighbourhood wellbeing, social and spatial justice, and community development. The geographical focus is the East Scarborough community, in close proximity to the U of T Scarborough campus. The course is…

Connected to the Classroom

What is it?

Curricular community-engaged learning provides opportunities for you to engage with community, nonprofit, or public organizations and reflect on the integration of course-based and community-based learning. You will learn under the guidance of a community partner, while ensuring the community is gaining value from your skill set and knowledge. These opportunities are typically supervised by a course instructor and are connected to a course or longer-term research project.

Why participate?

Curricular community-engaged learning offers you the chance to understand the issues raised in a course through the lens of a community partner. You will have the opportunity to learn new skills and encounter new perspectives while supporting community-identified priorities.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Curricular community-engaged learning takes place as part of a course. Eligibility requirements for these types of courses vary.

Duration: Curricular community-engaged learning opportunities may involve part-time or full-time hours with a community organization and can last from a few hours to a number of days or weeks over the course of an academic term. The timelines are variable and will be set within the course you are taking.

Recognition and / or compensation: You will receive course credit for participating in curricular community-engaged learning opportunities.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your academic program and your personal, academic, and professional goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or your registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: Community engaged learning courses are available through various academic programs at the University of Toronto. These opportunities can be embedded in a course, part of your degree requirements, or offered as an elective. Take some time to research the community-engaged learning courses offered through your academic unit. The Centre for Community Partnerships provides a list of many community-engaged learning courses.

Profiles:

Understanding the Role of Pharmacology & Toxicology in Society

Pharmacology and Toxicology in Society (PCL389) expands student knowledge regarding the science-behind and societal views of drugs with a focus on street and recreational drug use and substance abuse disorders. Classes focus on the science associated with drug use and class discussions integrate health/drug policy, socio-cultural and media views. Students spend 20 hours with a…

iPRAKTIKUM

iPRAKTIKUM is an experiential learning and internationalization initiative that helps students find impactful internships designed to promote global fluency and cultural competence and to deepen skills acquired in the classroom in work contexts. Placements are available at local schools and businesses in Toronto and Germany through futurGenerator, a program focused on sustainability and social innovation…

Health in Community

Health in Community is longitudinal curriculum for all medical students. Faculty members (physicians/allied health professionals) are paired with community agencies to deliver a challenging and immersive curriculum. Through in-class sessions, reflective assignments and community-based experiences, students participate, observe, contribute and explore advocacy as they investigate three key questions: what is community? Where is community? and…

What is it?

A field experience provides you with an intensive hands-on experience in a setting related to your field of study. Field experiences generally take place out of the classroom at a discipline- or profession-specific work site and is connected to a specific course. Your course instructor or a professional working on-site will supervise fieldwork.

Why participate?

Fieldwork can help to refine and develop the skills you are learning in your courses. Fieldwork offers an invaluable introductory opportunity for you to apply theoretical knowledge to real-world situations as well as potentially exposing you to a structured work environment.

Learn More:

Eligibility: Fieldwork experiences typically take place as part of a course. Eligibility requirements for these types of courses vary.

Duration: Fieldwork experiences can last from a few hours to many hours over the course of an academic term; timelines are set within your academic program.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your academic program and your personal and professional goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: Courses that incorporate fieldwork are available through various academic programs at the university. These opportunities may be embedded in a course, part of your degree requirements or, occasionally, offered as a co-curricular experience. Take some time to research fieldwork opportunities by connecting with your academic unit or your registrar’s office. Below are a few examples:

Profiles:

Bachelor of Kinesiology In-Field Learning

In the Bachelor of Kinesiology (BKin) program, professional placements, termed in-field learning, occur as a part of upper-year KPE academic courses. For these unpaid placements in the BKin program, students are matched with a qualified professional and observe and assist as appropriate in tasks with a kinesiology/physical education focus. Placements are offered in a variety…

Field Archaeology, NMC 261

Field Archaeology, NMC261 is a general practicum course for archaeological field methods with a focus on Near Eastern Archaeology. Partnered with Woodsworth College’s Summer Abroad Program, the course consists of a six-week archaeological field school which takes place in the Republic of Georgia. Students contribute to the active and ongoing research program of the Gadachrili…

What is it?

An organization-partnered project is an opportunity to support an external organization on a specific project. These opportunities are typically supervised by a course instructor and are connected to a course. You could support a creative performance, a design project, or act as a consultant to an organization facing a specific challenge.

Why participate?

Organization-partnered projects introduce you to the kind of work that is done in industry and community organizations, as well as the opportunities and issues organizations face when doing their work. They offer a chance to contribute to solving these challenges, while putting your education and skills to use.

Learn More:

Eligibility: Organization-partnered projects typically take place as part of a course. Eligibility requirements for these types of courses vary.

Duration: Projects of this nature are part-time and have a flexible duration; they can last from a few hours to many hours over the course of an academic term.

Recognition and / or compensation: You will typically receive course credit for participating in an organization-partnered project.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your academic program and your personal goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: Organization-partnered projects are available through various academic programs at the University of Toronto and these opportunities are generally embedded in a course. Check with your academic unit or registrar to discuss the best way to locate these opportunities.

Profiles:

Engineering Strategies and Practice, ESP

Engineering Strategies and Practice (ESP) is a foundational design course sequence that uses the engineering design process as a context for developing skills essential to the practice of engineering. Students work with clients facing problem in their workplace, community, or organizations. These are real world problems that students are tasked to solve through the utilization…

Understanding the Role of Pharmacology & Toxicology in Society

Pharmacology and Toxicology in Society (PCL389) expands student knowledge regarding the science-behind and societal views of drugs with a focus on street and recreational drug use and substance abuse disorders. Classes focus on the science associated with drug use and class discussions integrate health/drug policy, socio-cultural and media views. Students spend 20 hours with a…

Service Delivery Improvement (SDI) Project

Management at the University of Toronto Scarborough partnered with the Toronto East Quadrant Local Immigration Partnership (TEQLIP), a group that represents 40 newcomer settlement service providers in the Scarborough area. The agencies had difficulty tracking services due to a variety of data formats and were challenged in obtaining an overall sense of newcomer activity in…

Connected to the Community

What is it?

Co-curricular community-engaged learning provides opportunities for you to participate in projects with community, nonprofit, and public organizations. You will learn under the guidance of a community partner or a university instructor or staff member, while ensuring the community is gaining value from your skillset and knowledge.

Why participate?

Co-curricular community-engaged learning focuses on establishing a dialogue and relationship between the university and the community. This means that you get to take part in a civic and community-oriented educational experience while also becoming part of a larger community. You will have the opportunity to learn new skills and perspectives, often understanding issues facing specific communities in new ways, while also offering your own knowledge and expertise to support those communities.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Eligibility criteria will vary depending on the initiative in which you are interested in participating.

Duration: Co-curricular community-engaged learning opportunities may be one-time experiences or longer-term placements with a flexible duration.

Recognition and / or compensation: Most co-curricular community-engaged learning opportunities are unpaid and will offer recognition through the co-curricular record.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your academic program and your personal and professional goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit, your registrar’s office, or the Centre for Community Partnerships.

How to access / locate opportunities: Co-curricular community-engaged learning opportunities exist across the university. Some potential avenues to locate opportunities include:

Profiles:

iPRAKTIKUM

iPRAKTIKUM is an experiential learning and internationalization initiative that helps students find impactful internships designed to promote global fluency and cultural competence and to deepen skills acquired in the classroom in work contexts. Placements are available at local schools and businesses in Toronto and Germany through futurGenerator, a program focused on sustainability and social innovation…

Alternative Reading Week

Alternative Reading Week (ARW) is a three-day initiative during winter reading week, for students to volunteer in teams to support the needs of different organizations. By participating in ARW, students gain the opportunity to problem solve, work with peers from different disciplines and provide innovative solutions for community organizations’ identified challenges.

Community Youth Mentorship Initiatives, Indigenous Spirit Journey

Community Youth Mentorship Initiatives, engage students as volunteer mentors for youth on-campus and in the community through partnerships with local organizations and school boards. An example of a Youth Mentorship program is the Indigenous Spirit Journey. Over a 16- week program, student volunteers assist youth in experiential land-based activities aimed at: developing strong community leadership…

What is it?

An international experience allows you to turn the world into your classroom. The University of Toronto offers a diverse range of opportunities for you to go abroad. You may be interested in a course exchange, a research placement, an international co-op work term, or an international academic internship.

Why participate?

No matter where you go or for how long, learning abroad will shape you and how you see and relate to the world. You will experience different cultures, backgrounds, and forms of teaching. Learning abroad offers you academic, global, and professional advantages that will support you throughout your life.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Eligibility criteria will vary depending on the international experience you choose.

Duration: From a week-long program to opportunities that allow you to spend a full year abroad, there are various length and timing options available.

Recognition and / or compensation: Some international experiences are course-based and will therefore offer course- or program-credit. Co-curricular international opportunities may provide recognition through the Co-Curricular Record. If you are participating in a co-op opportunity abroad, you will be compensated by the placement organization.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on your academic, professional, and personal goals. Book an appointment with a Learning Abroad Advisor through the Learning Abroad’s contact form to find your best fit.

How to access / locate opportunities: The University of Toronto’s Learning Abroad website allows you to browse through a wide variety of international experiences.You can search by length of experience, country, area of study, language, and program type. The site also provides helpful tips and resources for planning your international experience, including information about potential funding opportunities.

Profiles:

Field Archaeology, NMC 261

Field Archaeology, NMC261 is a general practicum course for archaeological field methods with a focus on Near Eastern Archaeology. Partnered with Woodsworth College’s Summer Abroad Program, the course consists of a six-week archaeological field school which takes place in the Republic of Georgia. Students contribute to the active and ongoing research program of the Gadachrili…

What is it?

Land-based education explicitly links experiential learning with Indigenous cultures and ways of knowing and being. While Indigenous pedagogy precedes and exceeds “experiential learning,” land-based educational opportunities integrate some Indigenous connections and teachings explicitly into curricular or co-curricular experiences that might also be understood as experiential. Land-based education takes a variety of forms but always involves an environmental approach to the relationship between people and the land and a recognition of the deep connection between Indigenous peoples and the land.

Why participate?

Land-based education offers a way to both acknowledge the history of the land upon which the University of Toronto operates, while also incorporating an understanding of traditional Indigenous ways of knowing and being. Land-based education provides an opportunity to learn from and alongside Indigenous cultures and communities, and their relationship to the land, whether you are Indigenous or a settler.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Eligibility criteria will vary depending on the initiative or course in which you are interested in participating.

Duration: Land-based education opportunities may be one-time experiences or longer-term placements with a flexible duration.

Recognition and / or compensation: Some land-based experiences are course-based and will therefore offer course- or program-credit. Co-curricular opportunities may provide recognition through the Co-Curricular Record.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your academic program and your personal goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or your registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: There are various avenues to connect with land-based education opportunities at the University of Toronto.

Profiles:

The Anthropology and Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island (North America), ANT241

The Anthropology and Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island (North America), ANT241H is a community driven course by an Indigenous Action group (IAG) made up of members of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation (MCFN) with other Indigenous scholars, administrators and faculty. The overall goal of the course is to establish an Indigenous and settler…

Community Youth Mentorship Initiatives, Indigenous Spirit Journey

Community Youth Mentorship Initiatives, engage students as volunteer mentors for youth on-campus and in the community through partnerships with local organizations and school boards. An example of a Youth Mentorship program is the Indigenous Spirit Journey. Over a 16- week program, student volunteers assist youth in experiential land-based activities aimed at: developing strong community leadership…

Connected to the Workplace

What is it?

Academic internships are practical workplace-based experiences connected to a course or program of study, undertaken with the guidance of an experienced professional. An academic internship course includes both work experience and in-class academic components, the latter of which are intended to help contextualize and make connections between the work experience and discipline-based learning and theories.

Note: There are also internships that are not directly connected to a course or program of study. These typically fall outside the umbrella of experiential learning; you will need to be self-directed in locating these opportunities and making the most of your experience.

Why Participate?

Academic internships are a chance for you to gain professional experience under the guidance and support of an experienced professional, while integrating knowledge connected to your area of study. As academic internships are typically less structured than a co-op or co-op internship, you may have the ability to shape an experience that fits your needs, availability, and professional goals.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Academic internships have specific eligibility criteria that will differ depending on the course or program of study to which they are connected.

Duration: The duration for these opportunities vary. Academic internships will typically take place during an academic term of study with hours varying from part-time to full-time.

Recognition and / or compensation: An internship may be unpaid if it is for academic credit but must be paid if not.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on your academic, professional, and personal goals. Academic internships are generally completed in the latter portion of an academic program, as they support the exploration and application of discipline-based learnings acquired in earlier years. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: Courses and programs of study that incorporate academic internships exist across the university. Check with your academic unit or registrar to discuss the best way to locate these opportunities. Below are some examples of academic internships:

Profiles:

iPRAKTIKUM

iPRAKTIKUM is an experiential learning and internationalization initiative that helps students find impactful internships designed to promote global fluency and cultural competence and to deepen skills acquired in the classroom in work contexts. Placements are available at local schools and businesses in Toronto and Germany through futurGenerator, a program focused on sustainability and social innovation…

Internship in the Arts and Visual Studies: VST410H5

The Internship in the Arts and Visual Studies (VST410H5), offered by the Department of Visual Studies (DVS) at the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM), provides an excellent opportunity for students to gain practical work experience at an institution or business related to the arts and to visual studies. This course is especially tailored for mature…

Women and Gender Studies Practicum, WGS435

Experiential learning as feminist praxis has long been a fundamental part of Women and Gender Studies programs. Initiated in 2004, WGS435Y, the UTM Women and Gender Studies Practicum, is a year-long community engaged learning course that provides the opportunity for advanced WGS students to combine theory and practice through participating in a part-time unpaid placement…

What is it?

There are numerous opportunities to develop your job-ready skills through co-curricular experiences. These include taking a leadership role with a student club, working on the development and delivery of a student conference, participating in a job-shadowing program, or taking part in a hackathon.

Why participate?

Co-curricular simulated work experiences allow you to develop your skills, ability, and knowledge in areas that interest you and to contribute in various ways to the University community and society more broadly.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Eligibility criteria will vary depending on the initiative in which you are interested in participating.

Duration: Co-curricular workplace simulated experiences may be one-time experiences or longer-term roles with a flexible duration.

Recognition and / or compensation: Most co-curricular workplace simulated experiences are unpaid and many will offer recognition through the co-curricular record.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your personal and professional goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or your registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: The majority of these experiences are listed on the Co-Curricular Record (CCR). However, there may be additional opportunities that exist through your local division so take some time to reach out to your academic unit or registrar’s office to see what might be available and of interest to you.

Profiles:

Job Shadowing Program

The Job Shadowing Program expands students’ career thinking, supports their career exploration skills, and helps them consider what they could do with their degree. Both students and recent alumni (up to 2 years after graduation) are provided the opportunity to ‘shadow’ a professional for a minimum of a half-day, up to five days at the…

What is it?

There are two types of co-operative education programs.

Co-op involves alternating academic and paid work terms in opportunities related to your field of study. Co-op programs follow the academic calendar and allow you to explore various professional environments within a specific industry or field.

Co-op Internship involves a single work term where you work for an employer for 12 to 16 consecutive months after completing your second or third year.

Why participate?

The work experiences offered through each type of co-op program allow you to expand your knowledge, practise the latest theories and approaches in your particular discipline, develop employment skills, explore career options, and network with potential employers.

Learn more:

Eligibility: You need to be enrolled in a co-op program to participate in a cooperative education experience. Eligibility criteria differs for each program. Keep in mind that some co-op programs require admission directly from secondary school.

Duration: Work terms typically begin in January, May, or September and involve 4-, 8-, 12-, or 16-month terms of full-time work, although there can be some variation to these timelines.

Recognition and / or compensation: Co-op placements are paid by the placement organization.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on the co-op program in which you are enrolled.

How to access / locate opportunities: Check with the co-op office affiliated with your area of study. Below are a list of co-op offices at the University of Toronto:

Profiles:

Master of Science in Sustainability Management Program Co-op Program

The Master of Science in Sustainability Management (MScSM) Program is an interdisciplinary Program focusing on the intersection of science, business and community.Real-world learning and experiences are key components of our program design. Students complete a full 4-month co-op term in their chosen field of interest midway through their degrees, enabling them to put their coursework…

Professional Experience Year (PEY) Co-op

The PEY Co-op program is run out of the Engineering Career Centre (ECC) at the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering (FASE). In 2019 the Faculty celebrated 40 years of PEY Co-op. Currently, third-year undergraduate students register to participate in a recruitment cycle to compete for 12 – 16 months co-op work terms. The largest…

Arts & Science Co-op

Currently representing 35 academic programs at UTSC, the Arts & Science Co-op program houses over 40 years of expertise in co-operative education. We facilitate academically aligned paid co-op work terms and empower our students through extensive preparation: each Arts & Science Co-op student receives 55+ hours of job search training through co-op preparation courses prior…

What is it?

There are multiple ways to use your skills and knowledge to benefit society through entrepreneurship and innovation at the University of Toronto. There are courses, entrepreneurship programs (accelerators/incubators), and internships that introduce you to working in social enterprises or tech startups, provide opportunities to develop and launch your own business with support from experienced professionals, and help to develop an entrepreneurial mindset.

Why participate?

Exploring entrepreneurship and innovation while studying at the University of Toronto will give you the skills and resources you need to start, build, and scale your business ideas and/or an understanding of working in a social enterprise or tech startup space. Innovation skills are valuable in any career.

Learn more:

Eligibility: There are entrepreneurial opportunities available for students across the University of Toronto. Academic programs and courses that incorporate entrepreneurship will have specific eligibility criteria, as will programs offered by the various entrepreneurship programs (accelerators/incubators) that exist at the University of Toronto.

Duration: The duration will vary depending on how you choose to become involved.

Recognition and / or compensation: Some entrepreneurial offerings are course based and will therefore offer course or program credit. Some co-curricular opportunities will provide recognition through the Co-Curricular Record. Still others offer support and mentorship for your business idea in lieu of official recognition or compensation.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on your academic, professional, and personal goals. You may wish to speak with your academic unit or registrar about this.

How to access / locate opportunities: The University of Toronto Entrepreneurship page houses information about the majority of entrepreneurship and innovation opportunities at the University, including a list of courses and programs and links out to the various entrepreneurship programs (accelerators/incubators). You can also sign up for the Entrepreneurship e-newsletter for regular updates. Keep in mind that not all of these opportunities are experiential in nature.

Profiles:

Start-up Experience Program

The Start-up Experience Program matches a diverse range of undergraduate students to work with seed and early stage start-up companies supported by ICUBE UTM. ICUBE UTM mentors and supports students throughout a 5- to 10-week term, helping them develop transferable employment skills through a series of workshops, seminars, and micro work-term placements. The program consists…

New Venture Program

The New Venture Program blends academics with mentorship and relevant experience. It is a rigorous co-curricular program that involves the completion of several modules, culminating in a series of ‘defenses’ of a student venture’s business plan. Students will develop a strong background in business planning and management so that they can create sophisticated conceptual analyses…

What is it?

A professional practicum, also called a clinical placement, provides you with industry-specific skills cultivated in a professional environment under the supervision of a registered or licensed professional. This type of experience is primarily intended to support professional and discipline-based competency development. You do not have an independent workload while on a practicum but instead work alongside a professional.

Why participate?

For subject areas that require a professional practicum, many of the skills you learn in the classroom need to be supplemented with concrete experience. An integral aspect of a professional practicum is that you are given space to reflect on your experience, often receiving credit for written or oral reflections on what you have learned.

Learn More:

Eligibility: You need to be enrolled in an academic program that offers professional practicums. Eligibility criteria differs for each program. Keep in mind that some of these academic programs require admission directly from secondary school or from an undergraduate degree.

Duration: The duration of a professional placement varies and will be determined by your academic program.

Recognition and / or compensation:  These opportunities are generally unpaid since the work is done in a supervised setting and you will not typically have your own workload or caseload. You will receive course or program credit.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on the academic program in which you are enrolled.

How to access / locate opportunities: A number of professional post-secondary degrees require a professional practicum. You can learn more about some of these degrees below. If you don’t see your area of study represented, you may wish to connect with your registrar or academic unit to further investigate.

Profiles:

What is it?

The Work Study program is an opportunity for current undergraduate and graduate students to work on campus with faculty members and staff to enhance your disciplinary and professional learning. There are over 3,500 positions available each year across both the Fall/Winter term (September to February) and the Spring/Summer term (May to August). There are various resources and supports available to help make the most of your Work Study experience.

Why participate?

The Work Study program provides an opportunity to strengthen your skills, gain work experience, and explore how your academic studies translate into career possibilities. Since you are working on campus, you are generally able to negotiate your work hours to accommodate your course schedule and co-curricular activities with your employer. Your Work Study experience will also be recognized on the Co-Curricular Record (CCR).

Learn more:

Eligibility: The Work Study program is open to undergraduate and graduate degree students. Check the Career & Co-Curricular Learning Network’s Work Study page for full eligibility criteria for the current or upcoming Work Study term.

Duration: Work Study jobs typically require up to 15 hours of work per week to a maximum of 200 hours for the Fall/Winter term (September to February) and 100 hours for the Spring/Summer term (May to August).

Recognition and / or compensation: Work Study positions are paid, the Work Study Program minimum hourly rate is $15. Departments have discretion to pay a higher hourly rate.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on your academic, professional, and personal goals but you can participate multiple times throughout your time studying at the University of Toronto. Work Study is an excellent first work-integrated learning experience which can act as a launching point for future opportunities.

How to access / locate opportunities: Take some time to review important information about the Work Study program, including current eligibility criteria and timelines for the current program. During the hiring periods for the Work Study program, you can search available opportunities on the Career & Co-curricular Learning Network (CLNx).

Profiles:

Work Study Program, Heritage Language Variation & Change in Toronto Project

Understanding patterns of linguistic variation in multicultural and multilingual communities is the driving force of the Heritage Language Variation and Change in Toronto (HLVC) Project. Work study students design and conduct research projects that aid in developing and testing principles regarding which aspects of heritage languages (mother tongues that do not have official language status)…

Connected to Research

What is it?

Faculty-led research can take many forms, including doing archival research for a faculty member, or taking part in a hands-on research opportunity in the field.

Why participate?

Participating in a faculty-led research opportunity allows you to work one-on-one with faculty members, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows. You will contribute to the creation of knowledge while enhancing your critical and analytical skills and deepening your understanding of a subject area.

Learn More:

Eligibility: Eligibility for faculty-led research that takes place outside a course will vary depending on the requirements outlined by the lead researcher.

Duration: Faculty-led research opportunities vary in duration but would typically be part-time and would last anywhere from a few months to a number of years, depending on the needs of the research project.

Recognition and / or compensation: Faculty-led research opportunities will typically be paid opportunities.

Ideal time to participate: This will depend on your academic, professional, and personal goals. You may wish to consult with your academic unit or registrar to determine how best to incorporate a faculty-led research opportunity into your university experience.

How to access / locate opportunities: Faculty-led research-based experiential learning opportunities exist across the university and in almost every faculty.

Below are some sites that can provide a starting point when considering research-based opportunities at the University of Toronto:

Profiles:

Work Study Program, Heritage Language Variation & Change in Toronto Project

Understanding patterns of linguistic variation in multicultural and multilingual communities is the driving force of the Heritage Language Variation and Change in Toronto (HLVC) Project. Work study students design and conduct research projects that aid in developing and testing principles regarding which aspects of heritage languages (mother tongues that do not have official language status)…

Jackman Scholars-in-Residence

Jackman Scholars-in-Residence (SiR) is an annual 4-week undergraduate residency in humanities and social science research. SiR seeks to foster students’ research abilities, create a multidisciplinary community of students and faculty, and pioneer a collaborative, team-based model of experiential learning in the humanities and interpretive social sciences. Students live in St. George College residences, or at…

What is it?

Organization-partnered research opportunities allow you to work on a research project in collaboration with an organization typically outside of the university. These experiential learning opportunities are supervised by a course instructor and typically connected to a course, though opportunities can be found for more long-term partnerships or projects.

Why participate?

Organization-partnered research will connect you with industry partners and provide you with insights into how research is conducted outside academia. You will contribute to the creation of knowledge while enhancing your critical and analytical skills and deepening your understanding of a subject area.

Learn more:

Eligibility: Organization-partnered research that is directly connected to a course or program of study will have specific eligibility criteria that will differ depending on the course or program of study. Eligibility for organization-partnered research opportunities that are self-directed and take place outside a course will vary depending on the requirements outlined by the lead researcher or the initiative to which you are applying.

Duration: Projects of this nature tend to be part-time and have a flexible duration, they can last from a few hours to a more substantial time commitment over the course of an academic term or longer.

Recognition and / or compensation: Organization-partnered research opportunities that are course-based will offer course credit, those that are self-directed will typically be paid opportunities.

Ideal time to participate: This depends on your academic, professional and personal goals. You may want to discuss this with your academic unit or registrar’s office.

How to access / locate opportunities: Organization-partnered research opportunities are available through various avenues at the University of Toronto. These opportunities can be either curricular or co-curricular. You may wish to check with your academic unit or registrar to discuss the best way to locate course- or program-based opportunities.

Profiles:

Urban Communities and Neighbourhoods Case Study: East Scarborough, CITC01

The course is designed as an introduction to the theory and practice of participatory action research with an emphasis on youth participation and questions of neighbourhood wellbeing, social and spatial justice, and community development. The geographical focus is the East Scarborough community, in close proximity to the U of T Scarborough campus. The course is…